Tag Archives: medication

Emergency Kit

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One of my fellow tubie moms thought it would be a good idea to write a post on emergency preparedness for tubies.  Keeping your freezer stocked with a 30 day supply of blends is beneficial in the event of a power outage but, that won’t help if you are evacuated from your home in an emergency.

This bag is under Matt’s bed.  I equate it to a “diaper” bag on steroids.  Because he has night nursing, it is a requirement but I think everyone should have one in case of an emergency.  If there is an emergency, we can grab Matt and the bag at a moments notice.  This would in addition to the disaster supply kit you have (or should have) for your family.  Typically the kits are set up for 72 hours.  The bag should be restocked after every use or at least once a year.  Here is a list of the supplies I keep ready for our son:

  1. Formula-Even though your child may normally get whole food blends at home, That may not be practical in the event of a disaster.  It is good to keep some of the formula that he/she can tolerate for emergency purposes.  Make sure to include a cup (for oral feeders) and a mixing jug in case you dilute it.
  2. Water-Think about how much free water your child gets or drinks in a day then multiply by 3.
  3. Syringes, extension tubes and bolus feeders-The Mic-Key button comes with an extra extension tube for pump feedings and a bolus tube and syringe.  Even if you don’t use the bolus feeding tube, save them and pack them in the emergency bag.
  4. Medication-The pharmacy will supply you with small bottles extra “emergency” medication if you ask them.  We are required to give the school a 72 hour supply of all medication so I ask the pharmacy for additional bottles for the emergency bag.
  5. Exam gloves, hand sanitizer, wet and/or baby wipes-These make clean ups much easier if you are not near running water.
  6. Surgical masks-Many of our children have poor or compromised immune systems.  You can use the masks if you find yourself confined with others who might be sick.
  7. Dressing change supplies-Even if you normally use the reusable type, having some sterile 2×2 drain sponges and paper tape on hand can be a lifesaver.
  8. Diapers, pull-ups and disposable under pads (chucks)-The under pads make perfect changing pads.  If they get soiled, just toss them.  Also toss in some plastic grocery bags for when disposing of diapers and pull ups isn’t convenient.
  9. A change of clothes-Try to keep a light jacket, blanket and seasonal clothes in the bag.
  10. Finger food-If your child is an oral eater, keep a sealed package of his/her favorite snack.
  11. Lovey/soother-No matter what the age of your child, emergencies/disasters are scary.  Keep something in the bag that can distract and calm them.

Nooooo!

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So what do you think happened here?  Was it:

  1. The baby threw up.
  2. The syringe malfunctioned.
  3. The med port popped open.

If you guessed #2, you were right.  Sticky syringes can be annoying if not down right disastrous.  Has it happened to you or is it just me and the mom of this baby?  I have had to clean walls, ceilings and floors because I forced a syringe filled with medication or oils.  You know the drill.  You use a syringe, wash it, let it dry and forget about it until it’s time to reload it.  When bolus feeding a blenderized diet it can cause a sticky syringe within in 1 to 2 uses.  We all know tossing our syringes after so few uses is out of the question. You have to use those syringes 5-6 times a day minimum for up to a week so what do you do?  The answer:  Lubricate the plunger.

I use coconut oil for 2 reasons: 1) It was recommended to me by another Tubie mom and 2) when I used olive oil it still got stuck.  So here’s the process:

  1. Starting with a dry syringe and plunder, dip the plunder into a bowl containing slightly warm coconut oil.
  2. Make sure to coat all surfaces of the plunger.
  3. Insert the plunger into the syringe and move the plunger up and down inside the syringe several times while turning the plunder.
  4. For the 60cc syringe, I sometimes use my finger to lubricate the inside in addition to the plunger.  This is helpful if the blend is fairly thick or the syringe has been reused a number of times.

Now you are ready to load your feeding.  It is very important to give the feeding immediately after loading it. It has been my experience that, if you set the syringe down and come back to it, the plunger will be stuck.  And what happens when you have a syringe full of a blend and you try to force into the extension tube?  Refer to picture 1.

If you are feeding on the go, I suggest you carry the coconut oil with you in a small vial.20170130_091230  It is solid at and below room temperature so you will want to keep it somewhere that is fairly warm.  If you can’t do that, you can still use it on the plunder but you have to do step #3 until the friction in the syringe melts it.

I would love to hear what works for you.  Please leave a comment.  The more information we have the fewer, “Nooooo!” situations we will have.