Category Archives: Milks

Nut, seed and bean milks

Homemade “Ripple” (Split Pea) Milk

 

 

DIY Ripple Milk

  • Servings: 10-13
  • Difficulty: easy
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This recipe is more of an addendum to my split pea milk recipe.  I have had many more questions about it coming from Ripple drinkers.  Some of the struggles were:  separation, strong pea taste, watery taste and thickened texture.  My original recipe was written for g-tube feedings and oral eaters with limited taste experiences.  After fielding many of your questions, I set out to make a recipe that would work for Ripple drinkers.  Please keep in mind, nothing we make at home can match the process that Ripple can produce in the lab.  This recipe is creamier than my original recipe and does not separate.  Hopefully my adjustments will make it more palatable.  Please take note of the pictures above.  The picture in the top right corner show 2 mason jars.  The jar on the left is Ripple.  The jar on the right is the DIY Ripple.  Even after sitting overnight, it had not separated.

As always, my goal is not to just create and share new recipes but to educate:  To give information not opinions.  The pictures and notes are here to help you make the best choice for you.

Ingredients

  • 1 cup of dry split peas (cooked in 3 cups of water)
  • 4 large Medjool dates (3oz)
  • 2-4 teaspoons of vanilla
  • 10 teaspoons of Sunflower oil (or oil of choice)
  • 7-10 cups of water

 


Directions

Cooking the split peas: Place 1 cup of dried peas into a bowl and cover with 3 cups of water. Let sit for 8 hours or overnight. Transfer the peas into a pot or into the pressure cooker. If cooking on the stove, cook peas about 1-1 1/2 hours or until the peas are completely soft and all of the water has been absorbed. Stir. If using an electric pressure cooker, select “beans/lentils” and adjust the time setting to 15 minutes. Once the timer goes off, allow the pressure to release naturally. This may take up to 15 minutes. Remove lid and stir. Note, if using the pressure cooker it is important NOT to use the quick release. The starch in peas is very light. Using the quick release up and out of the pressure cooker through the valve making a mess:

Power Pressure Cooker XL (2)

Making the milk: Place 1 1/2 cups of cooked peas into the large (64oz) Vitamix container. Add 3 1/2-5 cups of water, dates, 1/2 of the oil (5 teaspoons) and vanilla and let stand (to soften the dates) for 30 minutes. Blend on High for 1 minute or use the “Smoothie” setting.  Transfer first batch to mason jars and ice cube trays.  Repeat the process with the remaining ingredients.  If If the texture is not to your liking, you may want to run the milk through a nut milk bag to remove the starchy component of the peas.

DIY Ripple (11)

 Please keep in mind that, if you need it to have a higher caloric content, you will lose quite a few calories this way.  The milk will keep fresh for about 4 days in the refrigerator.  How quickly you use the milk will help you decide how much to freeze.  After I use what is in the refrigerator, I take out only what I will use the next day and let it thaw overnight.

Food tips: Although sunflower oil is listed, I used regular vegetable oil because I didn’t have any and couldn’t find any.  I put it in the recipe because that is the oil listed on the Ripple label.  I don’t know if it would taste any different since vegetable oil is pretty tasteless.  I’m sure it’s better for you so use it if you can find it and afford it.  Calories/cup are 141.5.  The breakdown is in the Cronometer picture below. Because Ripple is making it’s milk from extracted pea protein and not whole peas, their protein content will be higher. Other than that, my DIY version of vanilla Ripple is pretty close it is consumed unfiltered:

 

 

Time tip:  If you have a pressure cooker, use it.  Time and clean up can be cut in half that way.  Freezing the extra milk in ice cube trays makes it easy to defrost exactly what you want. Each standard ice cube is 1 once.

Money Tip:  Buying your peas from a bulk food store like Winco Foods  is the best money saver.  Most of their bulk food items are 1/3 to 1/2 the cost of those bought prepackaged.  It also saves on waste because you only buy what you need.

Hemp Milk

  • Servings: 8
  • Difficulty: Very Easy
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Hemp milk is by far the easiest dairy milk substitute.  There is no cooking and, with the Vitamix, there is no need to run it through a filtration bag.  It is very calorie dense with lots of protein.  It tastes great as is but I’ve added a couple of ingredients for folks who like their milk substitutes a little sweeter.

Ingredients

  • 4oz hemp hearts
  • 2 cups of water
  • 4 pitted dates (about 1-1.5oz)
  • 1 1/2 cups of water
  • 2 teaspoons of vanilla

Directions

  1. Place hemp hearts, dates and 2 cups of water into the Vitamix into the container and secure lid.
  2. Select Variable 1.
  3. Turn machine on and quickly increase speed to Variable 10, then to High.
  4. Blend for 1 minute.
  5. Turn machine off and remove lid.
  6. Add the remaining 1 1/2 cups of water and the vanilla and secure lid.
  7. Select Variable 1.
  8. Turn machine on and blend for 10 seconds.

 

Food Tips:

  • It is a good idea to slice the dried pitted dates lengthwise before putting them in the Vitamix.  This will ensure that no part of the pit was left inside during processing at the plant.  I have yet to find any literature that says they are dangerous but the pieces can clog g-tubes.  Even if a piece gets through it could cause problems in the GI tract of someone who already has difficulty processing solid food.
  • If you have time, soak the dates and hemp seed for 30 minutes before blending.  This reduces the amount of sediment and completely removes the need for straining or filtering.
  • Store hemp seed in a mason jar.  It is easier to pour the seed into the Vitamix container than to scoop it out of a container with a spoon.  Also, store the seeds in the refrigerator.  Hemp seed is high in fat so they can go rancid quickly especially if you live in a hot/humid climate region.
  • One cup of fresh hemp seed milk has about  194 calories.  It has 10 grams of protein and 14 grams of fat so, unless you have a high caloric need, I suggest sticking to the 1/2 cup serving size.  Hemp milk will stay fresh in the refrigerator for 3-4 days.  Drink it straight or add it to smoothies.  It is also a great base for blenderized meals.
  • As with all “Super Foods” take the time to research and steer clear of the idea that “if less is good, more is better.”  This is very important if you are dealing with specialized or restricted diets, on medications or have various health conditions.

 

Time Tip:  Freeze any portion of the milk that will not be used in 3-4 days in ice cube trays.  Store the cubes in labeled and dated freezer bags for up to 6 months.  Since each cube is about an ounce, you can quickly grab what you need without wasting any.

 

Money tip:  Shop around before buying hemp hearts.  They can run as high as 12 dollars a pound in some stores and on line.  Winco has the lowest price at $7.02 a pound.  They can be found in the bulk food section for much less than the prepackaged bags.  It is good to alternate seed/nut milks.  If you are on a tight budget, alternate the types of nut/seed/bean milks you make to save money.  This is also important especially for individuals on blenderized diets to insure balanced nutrition.

 

Raw Coconut Milk

  • Servings: 8
  • Difficulty: easy
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coconut-milk-2

When I was a little girl growing up in Massachusetts, one of my favorite memories was making coconut beans and rice with my grandma. It was an old family recipe from Jamaica that was made during the holidays. When we were making it, the wonderfully sweet smell of fresh coconut filled the house. I can remember sitting at the kitchen table with a cheese grater grating the coconut meat by hand and placing it on cheese cloth. I can also remember the stern look I got from her when she caught me sneaking a piece to nibble on. It was my dad’s job to “milk” the coconut. The cheese cloth containing the shredded coconut was tied and placed in a pot of boiling water for 20 minutes then squeezed and measured. My dad was the only one tough enough to handle the job. All of this took lots of time but the final dish was like no other. It was a labor of love so we didn’t mind.

Fast forward to the present. Because of the Vitamix, I can make fresh coconut milk in a fraction of the time, no scraped knuckles from the grater, with less mess and nary a burn from scalding water.

Ingredients

Prepare fresh coconut

6oz fresh coconut meat

4 cups of water (total)


Directions

  1. Place coconut meat into the container and secure lid.
  2. Select Variable 1.
  3. Turn machine on and quickly increase speed to Variable 10, then High.
  4. Blend for 30 seconds or until a fine mash is formed using the tamper to press the coconut meat into the blades.
  5. Turn machine off, remove lid, scrape container with a Vitamix spatula, add 2 cups of the water and replace the lid.
  6. Select Variable 1.
  7. Turn machine on and quickly increase speed to Variable 10, then to High.
  8. Blend for 1 minute then pour contents into a Vitamix filtration bag to extract the milk.
  9. Return the mash in the filtration bag to the Vitamix container and add the remaining 2 cups of water.
  10. Repeat steps 6-8.

Food Tip: Save the coconut water extracted prior to removing the meat from the shell to drink separately.  Coconut milk is VERY high in fat calories so watch how much you drink (about 256 calories per 4oz serving). It is an excellent way to boost the calories in a blenderized or pureed diet for people with volume intolerance. Raw coconut milk will only stay fresh in the refrigerator for 4-5 days so freeze any unused milk and/or coconut water in ice-cube trays and store in dated labeled freezer bags. Always test for allergies by giving a small amount (1-2 tsp) over the course of 4-7 days.

Time Tip: Coconuts typically contain 12-14 oz of meat. Freeze any unused meat in a dated and labeled freezer bag for future use.

Money tip: Coconuts are less expensive during the holidays so stock up, process and save.

For more information on picking and processing fresh coconuts, please see my blog post on that topic.

Fresh Almond Milk

This recipe can be found in the Vitamix Whole Food Recipe book.  My twist on it is the added vanilla.  Because I filter my almond milk, I found that adding the vanilla after meant using less of it. Also the mash remains unflavored so it can be used in a variety of recipes.

GE

3 cups of water
1 cup of raw almonds
Sugar or sweetener to taste (optional)
1 tsp of vanilla

1. Place the water and the almonds into the Vitamix container and secure the lid
2. Select variable 1.
3. Turn machine on and quickly increase speed to variable 10, then to High.
4. Blend for 2 minutes or until desired consistency is reached.

Food Tip: Milk can be filtered through a nut milk bag for a smoother consistency. The remaining almond mash can be used in lots of other recipes. Processed almond milks contain additives and many contain added sugar. One carton I found had 15g of sugar whereas fresh unsweetened almond milk has 0g and it’s always fresh.

Time Tip: Many recipes for almond milk require hours of soaking before blending. With the Vitamix that is unnecessary so it can be made on the spot with no waiting. Freeze the almond mash in ice cube trays so that they can be quickly added to recipes in 1oz portions. You never have to defrost more than you will use.

Money Tip: A quart of processed almond milk can cost $5 but making it fresh is about half if you buy the raw almonds in bulk.